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Russian Vodka Room

Opening Hours
Today: 4pm–2am
Wed:
4pm–2am
Thurs:
4pm–2am
Fri:
4pm–2am
Sat:
4pm–2am
Sun:
4pm–12am
Mon:
4pm–2am
Location
265 West 52nd Street
Russian Vodka Room 1 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square

The intimate space of red lamps, candles and beautiful music is easy to miss, as the Russian Vodka Room is somewhat hidden behind darkened windows. Luckily, my attention was piqued by the faint sounds of a piano floating out of the bar and onto the street. Walking in, I immediately noticed the huge glass vats of vodka with handfuls of fruit floating in them. This, the bar's manager informed me, is the restaurant's specialty: house-brewed, naturally infused Russian vodka. The flavors include cherry, raspberry, and apricot. In addition, 100 varieties of bottled vodka clamor for prominence behind the bar. The Russian Vodka Room also boasts a relatively diverse menu, with food "straight out of babushka's kitchen."

Location
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Russian Vodka Room 1 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 2 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 3 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 4 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 5 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 6 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 7 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 8 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 9 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square
Russian Vodka Room 10 Bars Russian Midtown West Theater District Times Square

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