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Malachy's Donegal Inn

Opening Hours
Location
103 West 72nd Street
Neighborhoods
Malachy's Donegal Inn 1 American Bars Upper West Side

With its prime 72nd Street location, I have passed by Malachy's Donegal Inn almost daily, but had never stepped inside. I was always waiting for the day when I would be working on this street, so that I could go in with the Manhattan Sideways team and have a good time. And that is exactly what happened. "Looks can be deceiving, believe me," owner Bill Raftery immediately said when we popped in during the lunch hour in the middle of the week. He continued to speak lovingly and confidently of his pub, which has been in business since 1989. "This bar has the best pub food of any like it in the area," Bill stated. Looking around, we were pleased to find the old wooden bar packed from end to end. According to Bill, most of his lunch customers are crew guys from local theaters like The Beacon and Lincoln Center, and "they are loyal." Engaging in conversation with more than a dozen men and women, we learned a lot about Bill, and the warm environment that he has built.

As Bill continued to serve people from behind the bar, he spoke of how much the neighborhood has changed since he purchased Malachy's. On Saint Patrick's Day, the area used to be blanketed in green bar-goers. "You could not move in this neighborhood the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. There's nothing like seeing them blow up those balloons." Hikes in parking and travel costs have drastically reduced business on both of those days, he lamented. Still, he brightened up when pointing to the crowded bar, and said how his regulars are certainly devoted customers. Quite busy, he told us to stop by for a drink sometime soon, and headed into the kitchen.

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Malachy's Donegal Inn 1 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 2 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 3 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 4 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 5 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 6 American Bars Upper West Side
Malachy's Donegal Inn 7 American Bars Upper West Side

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The Ribbon 1 American undefined

The Ribbon

I walked into Ribbon, the new dining experience from Bruce and Eric Bromberg, on their "friends and family night" and was immediately impressed. One of the waiters, Alex Bar-av, explained to me the history of the building. It used to be the Hotel Franconia, built in the 1920s by Arnold Rothstein, a famous Jewish gangster best remembered for "fixing" the 1919 World Series. The Hotel Franconia became known as the only place where people could drink openly during the Prohibition, since Rothstein paid off the cops. To celebrate this quirky heritage, Ribbon's 200 seat restaurant has a private room called the "Arnold Rothstein Room. " Softly glowing cases of whiskey bottles on the walls add to the speakeasy-like feeling in the dark-wood room while also highlighting Ribbon's expansive whiskey collection (there are ninety-five types of whiskey on the menu). When I returned to the restaurant as an invited guest a few days later, Alex took me to see the darkened strip on the floor underneath a row of tables where the old bar used to be. He explained that when they gutted the space, the builders found the Hotel Franconia's original wood floor. The faded frescoes on the wall, now covered in glass, are also from the 1924 hotel. Alex is not alone in his in-depth knowledge. He told me that the employees are constantly being quizzed on their ability to give the facts to customers, not just about the food, but about Ribbon's story. Since my personal visits with Alex, I have had several terrific dinners at Ribbon, but it was especially nice when I came by with the Manhattan Sideways team and Alex brought out a collection of dishes for us to try. Laying them on tables made of repurposed wood from a Brooklyn warehouse floor, he served us a sextet of different kinds of deviled eggs, each with its own taste sensation, and a white bean hummus. The cauliflower covered in spicy buffalo sauce was my personal favorite. It is no surprise that the food is as good as it is, given that the Bromberg Brothers have twenty years of success in the culinary world behind them. "They know what they're doing, " Alex smiled. I mentioned to the others that I had not seen the cauliflower on the menu before, and Alex quickly chimed in to say that the menu has changed since the restaurant first opened. "We take customer feedback very seriously, " Alex shared, explaining that the food offerings were adjusted according to diners' comments. Ribbon is also known for a great raw bar, their fried chicken served only on Sundays and Mondays, their prime rib, and their hamburgers. Alex emphasized that this is a family friendly place. Despite the great skill of the staff, he pointed out that Ribbon is not considered "fine" dining. Instead, he referred to the restaurant as "elevated dining. "

Lost Gem
The Emerald Inn 1 Irish American Beer Bars Late Night Eats undefined

The Emerald Inn

The Emerald Inn had its home on Columbus Avenue and 69th Street since 1943, but in 2013, the family was unable to renew their lease. Charlie, the current owner, pointed out the "Emerald Inn" sign on the wall that came from the original bar. Although a third generation American citizen, we found Charlie to be Irish through and through. He explained that his great-grandparents, who started the Emerald Inn, grew up in the same town in the county of Galway, but that they magically met here, in the Bronx. Every May, Charlie does his best to travel to Ireland, and in return, his Irish relatives have visited him and his bar in Manhattan. He announced, "They have liked what they've seen. "Charlie has tried to maintain the Gaelic charm that his father, grandfather and great grandfather brought to the Inn. The menu continues to include Irish favorites like corned beef, fish and chips, and bangers and mash, but also offers some American classics like burgers and Reubens. "We do a solid lunch – everything is good here, " Charlie said proudly. As he poured a pint of Guinness like a pro, waiting for "the black stuff" to settle before filling the glass, I asked him a bit more about his family. I learned that his grandfather is still alive, in his eighties. Charlie told me that his grandfather used to be chummy with Hugh Downs, a former 20/20 ABC TV news magazine host who frequented the bar, along with many other ABC celebrities. Charlie remembers coming to the bar when he was as young as three years old. Once he hit working age, he slowly rose from dishwasher to waiter and then to bartender before taking over the bar from his father, who is now in semi-retirement. On a subsequent visit to the Emerald Inn, I was able to see all three generations together. Each man shares the same sense of humor and geniality. An excellent sense of hospitality clearly runs in the family, since all three men showed the same amount of friendliness and humor towards the Manhattan Sideways team, offering them plates of "Irish lasagna" and chicken marsala, which warmed the team's stomachs (along with the generous pitchers of beer! ). Charlie confided that he was worried when the rent on the previous location doubled, causing him to have to search for a new home. "We were very beloved in the neighborhood, " he informed me. They found the current location entirely by chance – Charlie's father was driving by as the previous owner was clearing out. He noticed a commotion, recognized that the space had been a bar, and immediately snagged it. Charlie was pleased to say that two years later, the bar has both gained new customers and retained many of their old ones. "There's a mix of everybody, " Charlie said matter-of-factly. "People are still finding us two years later. " One group that keeps coming back is the New York Ballet. They use Emerald Inn as their neighborhood hangout, but are a little disappointed with the low ceilings in the new location. "They used to be able to dance on the bar, " Charlie laughed. He then admitted that many of the dancers have known him since he was very little. "They still call me 'Baby Charlie, '" he said with a grin.

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Alice's Tea Cup 1 Breakfast Tea Shops Brunch American undefined

Alice's Tea Cup

Across the park and nine streets north from the 64th Street location, Olivia, a member of the Manhattan Sideways team, was still visibly excited to be sitting down to breakfast at Alice's Tea Cup. Though she loves each of the teahouse's three "chapters, " the 73rd Street cafe is the original - and the first one she visited as a young teen. She shared stories with me of coming here and marveling at the tiered Afternoon Teas that would arrive at her table, filled with scones, finger sandwiches and sweets. She questioned whether or not she might have been a bit too old at fifteen to celebrate her birthday here and then spent the rest of the afternoon wandering around New York blowing sparkle-filled bubbles, dressed in a pair of shimmering fairy wings acquired from the tea shop's front room, which is filled with whimsical retail items. On our visit to Alice's, Olivia, now a mature twenty-five, had her usual - a pumpkin scone with a personal pot of tea - while Tom, our photographer, ordered "the biggest coffee" they had. It arrived in a mug "the size of Tom's face. " Olivia pointed out all the Alice in Wonderland themed decorations that she remembered from previous visits, including a quote from the character of the Duchess written in fun purple font along the walls and an angry painting of the red queen in the bathroom, telling employees to wash their hands or "Off with your head! " Her favorite little decorative touch, however, was on the swinging door into the kitchen. There is a giant keyhole window, suggesting that maybe, like Alice, the diners had shrunk to the size of mice, and would be swept away into a magical land, scones and teacups in hand.

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Dive 75 1 Bars American undefined

Dive 75

From the conversations that I have had with others on the Upper West Side over the last few years, I have determined that almost anyone who lives or works nearby can tell you about Dive 75. It has been the neighborhood watering hole since 1998 when Lee Seinfeld and Jim Peterson first opened it. Prior to going into business together, they were both bartenders at Broadway Dive on 101st Street and had been friends for many years before that. As Lee puts it, “Our relationship is longer than either of our marriages. ” Each of their three Dive Bars has a subtle, aquatic theme, with fish tanks occupying a central location in the room. Though this feature is primarily a play on words, Lee did mention to me that Jim is a diver and owns a successful diving store. Despite the name, the bar is very clean. Despite the oxymoron, it truly is an “upscale” dive bar. “I can’t keep it as dive-y as I want to, ” Lee laughed. He keeps the venue in top shape and offers an extensive scotch, wine, and craft beer list that drinkers usually would not see in a true dive bar, since that seems to be what his customers prefer. He also pointed out that he has an impressive selection of ciders. “I love ciders, ” he said simply, telling me about a reasonably new cider provider called Aaron Burr from the Hudson Valley that uses foragers to collect their apples. Lee was then pleased to share that his son, Nicholas, now does a lot of the buying, having recently joined the business. When I stopped in late one afternoon, Shira Levine, one of the bartenders, was getting ready to open for the evening. Originally from Israel, Shira told me that she moved to New York in 2011 and essentially got a job at Dive 75 the very next day. She enjoys letting friends at home know where she works: “I tell them, ‘You know Cheers? ’ That’s where I work. ” She then added, “It’s Halloween here every day, ” since the bar always has candy on hand. When I asked what customers usually come in for, she answered, “The beer selection, the board games... basically, the great ambience. They just come to have fun. ” She added that people also come to be part of a group. In my conversations with Lee, he elaborated on this group vibe, saying that he did not realize how important the bar was to the community until 9/11. Shortly after the tragedy, people started showing up to the bar in droves, not to drink so much as to simply be together. “The bar became a hub where people went to console each other. ” Similarly, after Hurricane Sandy, when many were left without power, men and women visited Dive 75 so that they could eat a hot meal. Lee was happy to provide a service to those in need. “I’m proud to be able to serve the neighborhood. ” And it is evident that the neighborhood is happy to have him.

More places on 72nd Street

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Tip Top Shoes 1 Mens Shoes Women's Shoes Family Owned undefined

Tip Top Shoes

When I visited Tip Top Shoes in the summer of 2015, the store was celebrating its seventy-fifth anniversary. Danny Wasserman proudly showed me the most recent edition of Footwear News, which was essentially dedicated to Tip Top. There were messages from countless sponsors in the shoe world, congratulating the Wasserman family for their longevity. Sitting down with Danny and his children, Lester and Margot, who are in charge of West NYC and Tip Top Kids respectively was an absolute pleasure. Having grown up just a block away, Lester and Margot were immersed in the business even as toddlers. In high school, both began working at the store with their dad. Lester was immediately drawn into the world of shoes, learning as much as he could with the ultimate goal of opening his own sneaker shop, West NYC, a few doors down. Lester explained to me that Tip Top already sold sporty designer men's shoes, but that he expanded this concept into a trendier store in 2007. Margot, on the other hand, knew that she wanted to work in retail, but began her career with Ralph Lauren. She stayed there through the dot-com revolution and then returned to work for her father. Included in the copy of Footwear News was a picture of how the store looked decades ago. Display cases took up the first few feet on either side of the door. Danny's grandfather originally opened the store after coming to the United States from Israel. He chose to buy the little shoe shop, which had been uptown in Riverdale, from an elderly German couple. The family then moved the store to 72nd Street. "Things were very different, " Danny explained to me. "People were less affluent, there were fewer options, and every shoe in the store was in the window. " He told me that at one point there were two black shoes and two brown shoes for men, and that was what customers had to choose from. Expanding on the neighborhood's history, Danny said that the street was frequented by pimps. "We had white boots with fur at the time that we couldn't keep in stock. "Later, the store was expanded both forward (eliminating the window displays) and back. Today, Tip Top continues to have a loyal following, many from the next generation of shoppers. Having walked so many streets in Manhattan, Tip Top has been a wonderful reminder to me that the old world concept of customer service, with a warm staff who have been working with the Wassermans for years, still exists. This thinking was solidified when I asked the family why they never considered expanding to another location. The response from Danny simply stated that they never wanted to spread themselves too thin. "The reason for our success is because we're all here. "It was really touching to see how strong the glue is that holds the Wasserman family together. I was not surprised when I learned that Lester, Margot and their parents live in the same building, a block over on 72nd Street - but on different floors. Yes, Tip Top has been an incredible success story in the world of mom and pop stores, but not everyone has had the great fortune of such a beautiful family relationship. When I expressed this sentiment to Danny, he replied, "Everyone says how fortunate I am to have my kids, and they're right. " He then went on to say with a warm smile, "I mean, my son chooses to work with me six days a week. " Lester shook his head in agreement and responded, "And I am lucky to have the best possible teacher to educate me. "

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Gebhard’s Beer Culture 1 Beer Shops Bars Beer Bars undefined

Gebhard’s Beer Culture

“We are beer nerds, not beer snobs. ” That is how Bo Bogle, the general manager of Gebhard’s Beer Culture, and Peter Malfatti, its beverage director, would describe the wood-furnished, cozy bar and restaurant that they opened in the summer of 2016, featuring various local and foreign artisanal beers on tap. The people behind Gebhard’s Beer Culture - the sister restaurant to Beer Culture on 45th Street - are as enthusiastic about beer as they are about educating customers. Because many of the beers that they offer are unknown to the general public, Gebhard’s will always work to find the draught that best suits each customer’s palate. If one feels like tasting several selections, the beer flight - a tray of four small glasses - is a good choice. Along with the continuously changing list of beers, the kitchen offers an ample menu of munchies, many from Belgium, as this is where owner Matt Gebhard spent time as a foreign exchange student. I was enchanted to discover how playful the space is: Upstairs, there is a games room, complete with a dartboard, shuffleboard, Hacky Sacks, and BulziBucket. The decorations throughout the bar and restaurant are eclectic, with various beer signs and novelty items covering the walls. At the front, I discovered a nook full of records, as well as a well-loved bicycle helmet. Bo and Ryan, the bartenders on duty, matched the vibe of the restaurant with their jovial nature as they poured beers for the Manhattan Sideways team. They set out glasses of citrusy TarTan Ale, a Central Waters Brewing Co beer, and a fresh, hoppy Southern Tier 2x Tangier. The two men knew exactly what to select for a hot day in the city and enjoyed tag-teaming descriptions of each beer and brand. Bo explained to us that the motivation behind Gebhard's Beer Culture is essentially a “passion for the local beer market. ” With the recent proliferation of local breweries around the city and in the rest of the country, Bo feels that “individuals are making great beers and that should be acknowledged. ” However, he believes it is not enough to simply have them on tap, but rather, the bartenders should teach customers about the local beer scene. Beer Culture’s objective is as much educational as it is to host many good nights with friends. When asked about the one thing that he would like customers to know about their new bar, Bo grinned and said: “the second beer always tastes better than the first. ”

More Bars nearby

Lost Gem
Gebhard’s Beer Culture 1 Beer Shops Bars Beer Bars undefined

Gebhard’s Beer Culture

“We are beer nerds, not beer snobs. ” That is how Bo Bogle, the general manager of Gebhard’s Beer Culture, and Peter Malfatti, its beverage director, would describe the wood-furnished, cozy bar and restaurant that they opened in the summer of 2016, featuring various local and foreign artisanal beers on tap. The people behind Gebhard’s Beer Culture - the sister restaurant to Beer Culture on 45th Street - are as enthusiastic about beer as they are about educating customers. Because many of the beers that they offer are unknown to the general public, Gebhard’s will always work to find the draught that best suits each customer’s palate. If one feels like tasting several selections, the beer flight - a tray of four small glasses - is a good choice. Along with the continuously changing list of beers, the kitchen offers an ample menu of munchies, many from Belgium, as this is where owner Matt Gebhard spent time as a foreign exchange student. I was enchanted to discover how playful the space is: Upstairs, there is a games room, complete with a dartboard, shuffleboard, Hacky Sacks, and BulziBucket. The decorations throughout the bar and restaurant are eclectic, with various beer signs and novelty items covering the walls. At the front, I discovered a nook full of records, as well as a well-loved bicycle helmet. Bo and Ryan, the bartenders on duty, matched the vibe of the restaurant with their jovial nature as they poured beers for the Manhattan Sideways team. They set out glasses of citrusy TarTan Ale, a Central Waters Brewing Co beer, and a fresh, hoppy Southern Tier 2x Tangier. The two men knew exactly what to select for a hot day in the city and enjoyed tag-teaming descriptions of each beer and brand. Bo explained to us that the motivation behind Gebhard's Beer Culture is essentially a “passion for the local beer market. ” With the recent proliferation of local breweries around the city and in the rest of the country, Bo feels that “individuals are making great beers and that should be acknowledged. ” However, he believes it is not enough to simply have them on tap, but rather, the bartenders should teach customers about the local beer scene. Beer Culture’s objective is as much educational as it is to host many good nights with friends. When asked about the one thing that he would like customers to know about their new bar, Bo grinned and said: “the second beer always tastes better than the first. ”

Lost Gem
Dive 75 1 Bars American undefined

Dive 75

From the conversations that I have had with others on the Upper West Side over the last few years, I have determined that almost anyone who lives or works nearby can tell you about Dive 75. It has been the neighborhood watering hole since 1998 when Lee Seinfeld and Jim Peterson first opened it. Prior to going into business together, they were both bartenders at Broadway Dive on 101st Street and had been friends for many years before that. As Lee puts it, “Our relationship is longer than either of our marriages. ” Each of their three Dive Bars has a subtle, aquatic theme, with fish tanks occupying a central location in the room. Though this feature is primarily a play on words, Lee did mention to me that Jim is a diver and owns a successful diving store. Despite the name, the bar is very clean. Despite the oxymoron, it truly is an “upscale” dive bar. “I can’t keep it as dive-y as I want to, ” Lee laughed. He keeps the venue in top shape and offers an extensive scotch, wine, and craft beer list that drinkers usually would not see in a true dive bar, since that seems to be what his customers prefer. He also pointed out that he has an impressive selection of ciders. “I love ciders, ” he said simply, telling me about a reasonably new cider provider called Aaron Burr from the Hudson Valley that uses foragers to collect their apples. Lee was then pleased to share that his son, Nicholas, now does a lot of the buying, having recently joined the business. When I stopped in late one afternoon, Shira Levine, one of the bartenders, was getting ready to open for the evening. Originally from Israel, Shira told me that she moved to New York in 2011 and essentially got a job at Dive 75 the very next day. She enjoys letting friends at home know where she works: “I tell them, ‘You know Cheers? ’ That’s where I work. ” She then added, “It’s Halloween here every day, ” since the bar always has candy on hand. When I asked what customers usually come in for, she answered, “The beer selection, the board games... basically, the great ambience. They just come to have fun. ” She added that people also come to be part of a group. In my conversations with Lee, he elaborated on this group vibe, saying that he did not realize how important the bar was to the community until 9/11. Shortly after the tragedy, people started showing up to the bar in droves, not to drink so much as to simply be together. “The bar became a hub where people went to console each other. ” Similarly, after Hurricane Sandy, when many were left without power, men and women visited Dive 75 so that they could eat a hot meal. Lee was happy to provide a service to those in need. “I’m proud to be able to serve the neighborhood. ” And it is evident that the neighborhood is happy to have him.