About usPartner with usSign up to our Newsletter

Amsterdam Ale House

Opening Hours
Today: 12pm–2am
Wed:
12pm–2am
Thurs:
12pm–2am
Fri:
12pm–2am
Sat:
12pm–2am
Sun:
12pm–2am
Mon:
12pm–2am
Location
340 Amsterdam Avenue
Neighborhoods
Location
Loading
Sign up to Sidestreet Updates

More Bars nearby

Lost Gem
Gebhard’s Beer Culture 1 Beer Shops Bars Beer Bars undefined

Gebhard’s Beer Culture

“We are beer nerds, not beer snobs. ” That is how Bo Bogle, the general manager of Gebhard’s Beer Culture, and Peter Malfatti, its beverage director, would describe the wood-furnished, cozy bar and restaurant that they opened in the summer of 2016, featuring various local and foreign artisanal beers on tap. The people behind Gebhard’s Beer Culture - the sister restaurant to Beer Culture on 45th Street - are as enthusiastic about beer as they are about educating customers. Because many of the beers that they offer are unknown to the general public, Gebhard’s will always work to find the draught that best suits each customer’s palate. If one feels like tasting several selections, the beer flight - a tray of four small glasses - is a good choice. Along with the continuously changing list of beers, the kitchen offers an ample menu of munchies, many from Belgium, as this is where owner Matt Gebhard spent time as a foreign exchange student. I was enchanted to discover how playful the space is: Upstairs, there is a games room, complete with a dartboard, shuffleboard, Hacky Sacks, and BulziBucket. The decorations throughout the bar and restaurant are eclectic, with various beer signs and novelty items covering the walls. At the front, I discovered a nook full of records, as well as a well-loved bicycle helmet. Bo and Ryan, the bartenders on duty, matched the vibe of the restaurant with their jovial nature as they poured beers for the Manhattan Sideways team. They set out glasses of citrusy TarTan Ale, a Central Waters Brewing Co beer, and a fresh, hoppy Southern Tier 2x Tangier. The two men knew exactly what to select for a hot day in the city and enjoyed tag-teaming descriptions of each beer and brand. Bo explained to us that the motivation behind Gebhard's Beer Culture is essentially a “passion for the local beer market. ” With the recent proliferation of local breweries around the city and in the rest of the country, Bo feels that “individuals are making great beers and that should be acknowledged. ” However, he believes it is not enough to simply have them on tap, but rather, the bartenders should teach customers about the local beer scene. Beer Culture’s objective is as much educational as it is to host many good nights with friends. When asked about the one thing that he would like customers to know about their new bar, Bo grinned and said: “the second beer always tastes better than the first. ”

Lost Gem
Malachy's Donegal Inn 1 Bars American undefined

Malachy's Donegal Inn

With its prime 72nd Street location, I have passed by Malachy's Donegal Inn almost daily, but had never stepped inside. I was always waiting for the day when I would be working on this street, so that I could go in with the Manhattan Sideways team and have a good time. And that is exactly what happened. "Looks can be deceiving, believe me, " owner Bill Raftery immediately said when we popped in during the lunch hour in the middle of the week. He continued to speak lovingly and confidently of his pub, which has been in business since 1989. "This bar has the best pub food of any like it in the area, " Bill stated. Looking around, we were pleased to find the old wooden bar packed from end to end. According to Bill, most of his lunch customers are crew guys from local theaters like The Beacon and Lincoln Center, and "they are loyal. " Engaging in conversation with more than a dozen men and women, we learned a lot about Bill, and the warm environment that he has built. As Bill continued to serve people from behind the bar, he spoke of how much the neighborhood has changed since he purchased Malachy's. On Saint Patrick's Day, the area used to be blanketed in green bar-goers. "You could not move in this neighborhood the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. There's nothing like seeing them blow up those balloons. " Hikes in parking and travel costs have drastically reduced business on both of those days, he lamented. Still, he brightened up when pointing to the crowded bar, and said how his regulars are certainly devoted customers. Quite busy, he told us to stop by for a drink sometime soon, and headed into the kitchen.

Lost Gem
Dublin House 1 Sports Bars Bars Founded Before 1930 undefined

Dublin House

"We open every day at 9 a. m. I don't know why. I guess it's an old Irish way. It lets people know that we care about them. As a matter of fact, it used to be 8 a. m, ” shared Nicola Cusack, who has been working behind the bar at Dublin House since 2014. She added, “We don’t close until 4 a. m. ”A gentleman named Caraway rented the space in 1921 and ran Dublin House as a restaurant upstairs and a speakeasy downstairs. It never drew attention as a bar, making it ideal during Prohibition. When the need for secrecy ended in 1933, Caraway purchased the building and hung a large neon bar sign outside. To this day, the green harp continues to light up the neighborhood while the original iron gates framing the entrance welcome guests. Nothing has changed. “We even have the payphone and the mirrors in their original spots, and the wooden bar — with the holes in it from people putting out their cigarettes — remains untouched, ” noted Nicola. And, it has now been immortalized by a scene filmed there for the 2020 season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Caraway handed over the bar to his nephew, Chris Waters, who continued to run it for decades. Chris still lives upstairs but passed the baton to Mike Cormican in 2006, who had been a trusted bartender at Dublin House for some twenty-five years. “Chris still pops down to have a cup of tea and visit with all the old-timers, ” Nicola said. Many are from the neighborhood and have been stopping in for a daily pint of Guinness for years, but there are also the tourists who have read about the bar and come check it out after exploring the Museum of Natural History or catching a show at the Beacon Theater. The Dublin House’s long, narrow bar has always been a place to celebrate and commiserate, as exemplified when used as a setting for The Force, a 2017 gritty police action novel by Don Winslow. What resonates most with Nicola is that “women feel comfortable coming in, even on their own. ” She also appreciates watching the younger generation interact with the older folks, even outside the bar. “We are one big happy family. ”

Lost Gem
Dive 75 1 Bars American undefined

Dive 75

From the conversations that I have had with others on the Upper West Side over the last few years, I have determined that almost anyone who lives or works nearby can tell you about Dive 75. It has been the neighborhood watering hole since 1998 when Lee Seinfeld and Jim Peterson first opened it. Prior to going into business together, they were both bartenders at Broadway Dive on 101st Street and had been friends for many years before that. As Lee puts it, “Our relationship is longer than either of our marriages. ” Each of their three Dive Bars has a subtle, aquatic theme, with fish tanks occupying a central location in the room. Though this feature is primarily a play on words, Lee did mention to me that Jim is a diver and owns a successful diving store. Despite the name, the bar is very clean. Despite the oxymoron, it truly is an “upscale” dive bar. “I can’t keep it as dive-y as I want to, ” Lee laughed. He keeps the venue in top shape and offers an extensive scotch, wine, and craft beer list that drinkers usually would not see in a true dive bar, since that seems to be what his customers prefer. He also pointed out that he has an impressive selection of ciders. “I love ciders, ” he said simply, telling me about a reasonably new cider provider called Aaron Burr from the Hudson Valley that uses foragers to collect their apples. Lee was then pleased to share that his son, Nicholas, now does a lot of the buying, having recently joined the business. When I stopped in late one afternoon, Shira Levine, one of the bartenders, was getting ready to open for the evening. Originally from Israel, Shira told me that she moved to New York in 2011 and essentially got a job at Dive 75 the very next day. She enjoys letting friends at home know where she works: “I tell them, ‘You know Cheers? ’ That’s where I work. ” She then added, “It’s Halloween here every day, ” since the bar always has candy on hand. When I asked what customers usually come in for, she answered, “The beer selection, the board games... basically, the great ambience. They just come to have fun. ” She added that people also come to be part of a group. In my conversations with Lee, he elaborated on this group vibe, saying that he did not realize how important the bar was to the community until 9/11. Shortly after the tragedy, people started showing up to the bar in droves, not to drink so much as to simply be together. “The bar became a hub where people went to console each other. ” Similarly, after Hurricane Sandy, when many were left without power, men and women visited Dive 75 so that they could eat a hot meal. Lee was happy to provide a service to those in need. “I’m proud to be able to serve the neighborhood. ” And it is evident that the neighborhood is happy to have him.

More places on 76th Street

Lost Gem
West Side Institutional Synagogue 1 Synagogues Founded Before 1930 undefined

West Side Institutional Synagogue

The West Side Institutional Synagogue, with its towering stone walls and ornamental turrets, is a building of religious importance, though the worshiping that takes place inside may not be clear from the outside. This is because the building was originally erected as a Methodist church in 1889, but then became the home to the synagogue in 1937. Chet Lipson, a member of the congregation, and the temple’s Rabbi, Daniel Sherman, offered to give us a tour of the magnificent structure. The annex, which was added to the main synagogue in 1958, as the stone plaque outside indicates, houses both a preschool and a senior center. Our two guides led us past small children and strollers into the room where the morning services take place. The space is primarily used by Tifereth Yisrael, the Yemenite group that rents the room from West Side Institutional. We then entered the main sanctuary, which, given that WSIS is orthodox, is split up into a men’s and a women’s section. Rabbi Sherman elaborated, however, that the gender separation is only enforced during prayer and that co-ed seating is allowed during lectures and speeches. I was amazed at the size of the room, which the men boasted seats some 600 people and is considered to be the second largest sanctuary on the West Side. On a separate occasion, I had the pleasure of speaking with Rabbi Aaron Reichel, a practicing attorney, whom the other two men referred to as the synagogue’s historian. He explained that the congregation was formed in 1917 and began holding events in theaters in Harlem. In the early twentieth century, Harlem had the third largest concentration of Jews in the world, after Warsaw, Poland and the Lower East Side. During its heyday, the Institutional Synagogue’s Hebrew School contained a thousand students and over three thousand people passed through the doors of the synagogue each day. When the Jewish population started shifting away from Harlem, the synagogue ultimately moved downtown, landing in its current location. The congregation changed the stained glass windows of the old church, covered the murals, and removed the organ, turning the structure into a new kind of religious home. In the 1960s, however, there was a fire that destroyed the interior. They managed to save the torahs, but the sanctuary had to be rebuilt. While sharing photos of the reconstruction with me, Aaron spoke of the highly regarded Rabbi Herbert S. Goldstein, who founded the synagogue and was an incredibly influential figure in Jewish-American history. Aaron's passion for this great man, which inspired him to write The Maverick Rabbi, is especially understandable, considering Rabbi Goldstein was Aaron’s grandfather. Aaron gave me the shortlist of the Rabbi’s accomplishments, including making kosher food available on a national scale, becoming president of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, and being one of the first American-born orthodox rabbis. Rabbi Goldstein’s goal for the synagogue was to make it both 100% orthodox and 100% American, with an equal emphasis on Judaism and patriotism. I was particularly touched when Aaron mentioned that the synagogue hosted monumental Thanksgiving parties and that many of its congregants joined the army to fight in both World Wars, with Rabbi Goldstein sending them rousing letters throughout their time in service. Aaron’s interest in the synagogue is both personal and academic. He has done an extraordinary amount of research on the building and its influential members, but he also has been an active member of the synagogue for a large portion of his life... it was his father who married Rabbi Goldstein’s daughter and took over in 1960. Aaron would sometimes unofficially fill in for his father when he was away, as he was the one who had his finger on the pulse of the temple. He noticed that after the fire, the synagogue took a while to return to its former glory. He thanks Rabbi Shlomo Einhorn, however, for reinvigorating WSIS in the 2000s. He credits the rabbi with “building up the synagogue again. ” He also believes the synagogue is fortunate to have the dynamic Rabbi Sherman as its spiritual leader today, "to lead it into a future that will hopefully not just match but exceed the synagogue’s glorious past. "

Lost Gem
Monogram Cottage 1 Gift Shops Childrens Clothing For Kids undefined

Monogram Cottage

There are very few items that the husband and wife team, Carlisle and Daphne, have not monogrammed at some point in their shop. Filled to the brim with hats, robes, sweaters, lunch boxes, and even stuffed animals and piggy banks, Monogram Cottage has a plethora of clothing and other gifts that are begging to have initials or names put on them. The pair, originally from Jamaica, can add lettering to a variety of materials, including plastic. Their creative juices appear to always be flowing, especially when they monogrammed hospital slippers to bring to patients. Though the Cottage functions mainly as a gift shop, Carlisle was quick to tell me that he and his wife are always happy to monogram pieces that people bring to him. In addition, they create custom designs and fonts for their customers. Going down to the basement with Carlisle, where most of the stock is kept, I was surprised to learn how high-tech the monogramming art is: Carlisle creates a design using a specific computer program that converts the lettering into a stitching pattern. That pattern is then sent upstairs to Daphne’s computer next to her sewing machine, where she sews the design onto the chosen item. Apparently, it was Daphne who piqued his interested in monogramming – she was trained to do this through her former job, ultimately allowing the couple to enthusiastically open up Monogram Cottage outside of Manhattan, in Dobbs Ferry, NY. From the moment they opened their store in 2004, the pair had many New York City clients, ultimately causing them to decide to open another shop in Manhattan. Their first one, in 2013, was on 78th Street, but two years later they were forced to move (the building was being demolished), thus landing them on 76th. Today, they are content to focus their energy solely on the Upper East Side, having given up their Dobbs Ferry location. In the basement, in addition to shelves full of labeled gift items and Carlisle’s massive computer, there is a small cot. Carlisle told me that the bed is a very important part of the business. Sometimes, Daphne has so much work to complete that she is at her sewing machine long into the night and has to have a place to lie down for a little bit. Sure enough, during my visit, Daphne was sewing the entire time. The couple works hard to earn the second half of their store’s name: “Best Personalized Gifts. ”

Lost Gem
Jones Wood Foundry 1 British undefined

Jones Wood Foundry

Though I spent a year and a half living in London in my younger years, I did not become nearly as attached to English cuisine as Olivia, a member of the Manhattan Sideways team, did when she lived there. I realized this when her eyes lit up as Arjuna, the executive chef of Jones Wood Foundry, brought out plates of English pies and fish and chips for us to sample. With a huge smile, she dug into the mushy peas, made with fresh peas instead of the traditional canned, and the flaky battered cod. She and Sideways photographer Tom then tackled the meat pie of the day, made in a rosemary crust. I tried the accompanying mashed potatoes, which were impossibly soft and fluffy – I later learned that the kitchen goes through twenty pounds of potatoes and four pounds of butter to make them. We were in taste-heaven. We dined outside in the charming backyard garden as we spoke to Arjuna who told us about his Indian heritage and his time traveling through Europe. He began by saying that food is deeply tied to love and happiness in Indian culture. “If the mother’s in a bad mood, Indian families eat nothing.... So the moral of that is: make your mom happy. ” Though Arjuna is a dual citizen, British and American, he has always chosen to stay in the States. He pointed out, “All the kinds of cuisine you could ask for are right here in New York. ” He explained that though he had spent a little time in Cornwall in St. Ives, he had not cooked very much traditional English food until joining the Jones Wood team. He learned a lot from Jason Hicks, the owner and former executive chef, who designed the menu and has since taken on more of a consulting role. Jason wanted Jones Wood to be a “food-driven pub, ” where people can come in with no expectations and then be wowed. As Arjuna stated, “There’s something for everyone” on the menu, pointing out that they had changed the recipe of the French fries to use canola oil instead of beef fat, so that they would be vegetarian-friendly. Moreover, they are triple cooked and slow fried so that they are extra crispy. It is not just the food at Jones Wood Foundry that is authentically British – the interior of the restaurant, designed by Yves Jadot, is filled with touches of English culture. There are pint mugs, hunting horns, photos of the English military and Winston Churchill, cricket bats, British bus stop signs, and the obligatory “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster. I expected Arjuna to tell me that the restaurant is home to numerous ex-pats yearning for well-made English food, but instead he said that there are actually a lot of locals who come four to five times a week. “They give me a big hug, ” he said with a smile. The name, despite being Anglican, is possibly the most American thing about the pub. In the nineteenth Century and earlier, the pub's current neighborhood was a forest known as “Jones’s Wood. ” It almost became the main parkland for Manhattanites, but lost the bid to Central Park. Shortly afterwards, the building that now houses the restaurant was constructed and occupied by a foundry that produced railings, weather vanes, manhole covers, and many other metal works. When Jason Hicks opened his restaurant in 2009, he chose to name it after the original business that was housed in the space. After we told him how fun we find it to explore the kitchens of the restaurants that we visit, Arjuna invited us downstairs to watch him make Sticky Toffee Pudding, a traditional English dessert composed of fluffy cake, often with currants, with molten toffee sauce poured on top. Though he appeared to be at ease with us while sitting in the courtyard, it was when he entered these quarters that we noticed he came into his own, like a fish in water. It makes sense: a large part of Arjuna’s life is connected to the culinary world. He even met his wife, now a successful playwright, in a restaurant. At Arjuna's urging, we ascended the steps back to the garden, where he served us his masterpiece. The dessert, smelling of rich molasses with a scoop of ice cream on the side, was positively scrumptious. Beautiful weather, a lovely setting and a terrific, dedicated chef made for a perfect afternoon.

More American nearby

Lost Gem
Malachy's Donegal Inn 1 Bars American undefined

Malachy's Donegal Inn

With its prime 72nd Street location, I have passed by Malachy's Donegal Inn almost daily, but had never stepped inside. I was always waiting for the day when I would be working on this street, so that I could go in with the Manhattan Sideways team and have a good time. And that is exactly what happened. "Looks can be deceiving, believe me, " owner Bill Raftery immediately said when we popped in during the lunch hour in the middle of the week. He continued to speak lovingly and confidently of his pub, which has been in business since 1989. "This bar has the best pub food of any like it in the area, " Bill stated. Looking around, we were pleased to find the old wooden bar packed from end to end. According to Bill, most of his lunch customers are crew guys from local theaters like The Beacon and Lincoln Center, and "they are loyal. " Engaging in conversation with more than a dozen men and women, we learned a lot about Bill, and the warm environment that he has built. As Bill continued to serve people from behind the bar, he spoke of how much the neighborhood has changed since he purchased Malachy's. On Saint Patrick's Day, the area used to be blanketed in green bar-goers. "You could not move in this neighborhood the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. There's nothing like seeing them blow up those balloons. " Hikes in parking and travel costs have drastically reduced business on both of those days, he lamented. Still, he brightened up when pointing to the crowded bar, and said how his regulars are certainly devoted customers. Quite busy, he told us to stop by for a drink sometime soon, and headed into the kitchen.

Lost Gem
Irving Farm Coffee Roasters 1 American Coffee Shops Breakfast undefined

Irving Farm Coffee Roasters

When we visited Irving Farm late one morning, almost every seat was taken and there was a constant stream of people ordering cappuccinos and breakfast sandwiches. "This is one of our busiest locations, " Liz Dean, the manager, said, explaining that it functions as a flagship store. There was a wide demographic, from mothers and young children to groups of out of towners. "This neighborhood is very interesting - we get a nice mix of regulars and tourists, " Liz pointed out. Liz was a regular for a while before becoming a member of the team. Now that she does the hiring, she looks out for people like herself, people who understand what Irving Farms is about and are already invested in its product. "I prefer to hire people who love our coffee, " she admitted. Two former college friends, David Elwell and Steve Leven, founded the company in 1996. The roasting is done in a carriage house in Millerton, New York, and there are now five cafes scattered throughout the city, as well as a training "Loft" in Chelsea. Though the cafe on Irving Place is the original, as the name would imply, it was recently renovated to look more like the Upper West Side spot, which opened in 2012, making the 79th street store the model for future expansion. In addition, Irving Farms has wholesale clients throughout the country and there are two more cafes set to open - one on the Upper East Side and another at the Fulton Street station. Liz is particularly excited for the Upper East Side location, since many of her customers live or work on the other side of the park. While the coffee menu is the same at each of the Irving Farms locations, the food offerings change slightly. 79th offers a wide range of food, thanks to the size of its kitchen. Demba, the barista, appeared to be both a master of foam art and a friendly face to many. He greeted people by name, effortlessly remembering their regular orders. My daughter, Joelle, who was visiting on the day that we were walking on 79th, declared that her decaf latte was "Rich and oh so good, " and elaborated by saying it was a "real cup of coffee, " not what she was use to being served in the Boston area. She was also thrilled with her scrambled eggs on a homemade flaky cheddar cheese biscuit with avocado. Liz was pleased with Joelle's reaction, commenting, "The breakfast sandwiches are huge here. " Liz went on to say that the lattes and pour overs are also popular, but that coffee lovers equally enjoy trying the single origin coffees, which are rotated throughout the year. Irving Farm is part of the Specialty Coffee Association of America, but they try to go above and beyond the definition of "specialty" by not buying coffee that is graded less than 85 in the 100-point system. They consistently try to give back to the farmers as much as possible, including featuring profiles of the farmers on their website. "In the city, it's so easy for there to be a disconnect between you and what you consume, " Liz said after speaking to us about her trip to El Salvador, where the ethics behind coffee were really driven home. People often ask Liz if she feels threatened by Starbucks, and her simple answer is "Absolutely not. " Liz and her co-workers know that Irving Farms is targeting customers who can taste and appreciate the difference. "We are, after all, a coffee roasting company first and foremost. "Yes, they are known for their coffee, and people are constantly stopping in for a fresh cup. However, I also appreciate that later in the afternoon, Irving Farm has a different vibe. Wine and beer alongside cheese boards are brought out, and people are given the opportunity to relax and participate in pleasant, quiet conversation while unwinding from the day.

Lost Gem
The Emerald Inn 1 Irish American Beer Bars Late Night Eats undefined

The Emerald Inn

The Emerald Inn had its home on Columbus Avenue and 69th Street since 1943, but in 2013, the family was unable to renew their lease. Charlie, the current owner, pointed out the "Emerald Inn" sign on the wall that came from the original bar. Although a third generation American citizen, we found Charlie to be Irish through and through. He explained that his great-grandparents, who started the Emerald Inn, grew up in the same town in the county of Galway, but that they magically met here, in the Bronx. Every May, Charlie does his best to travel to Ireland, and in return, his Irish relatives have visited him and his bar in Manhattan. He announced, "They have liked what they've seen. "Charlie has tried to maintain the Gaelic charm that his father, grandfather and great grandfather brought to the Inn. The menu continues to include Irish favorites like corned beef, fish and chips, and bangers and mash, but also offers some American classics like burgers and Reubens. "We do a solid lunch – everything is good here, " Charlie said proudly. As he poured a pint of Guinness like a pro, waiting for "the black stuff" to settle before filling the glass, I asked him a bit more about his family. I learned that his grandfather is still alive, in his eighties. Charlie told me that his grandfather used to be chummy with Hugh Downs, a former 20/20 ABC TV news magazine host who frequented the bar, along with many other ABC celebrities. Charlie remembers coming to the bar when he was as young as three years old. Once he hit working age, he slowly rose from dishwasher to waiter and then to bartender before taking over the bar from his father, who is now in semi-retirement. On a subsequent visit to the Emerald Inn, I was able to see all three generations together. Each man shares the same sense of humor and geniality. An excellent sense of hospitality clearly runs in the family, since all three men showed the same amount of friendliness and humor towards the Manhattan Sideways team, offering them plates of "Irish lasagna" and chicken marsala, which warmed the team's stomachs (along with the generous pitchers of beer! ). Charlie confided that he was worried when the rent on the previous location doubled, causing him to have to search for a new home. "We were very beloved in the neighborhood, " he informed me. They found the current location entirely by chance – Charlie's father was driving by as the previous owner was clearing out. He noticed a commotion, recognized that the space had been a bar, and immediately snagged it. Charlie was pleased to say that two years later, the bar has both gained new customers and retained many of their old ones. "There's a mix of everybody, " Charlie said matter-of-factly. "People are still finding us two years later. " One group that keeps coming back is the New York Ballet. They use Emerald Inn as their neighborhood hangout, but are a little disappointed with the low ceilings in the new location. "They used to be able to dance on the bar, " Charlie laughed. He then admitted that many of the dancers have known him since he was very little. "They still call me 'Baby Charlie, '" he said with a grin.

Lost Gem
Alice's Tea Cup 1 Breakfast Tea Shops Brunch American undefined

Alice's Tea Cup

Across the park and nine streets north from the 64th Street location, Olivia, a member of the Manhattan Sideways team, was still visibly excited to be sitting down to breakfast at Alice's Tea Cup. Though she loves each of the teahouse's three "chapters, " the 73rd Street cafe is the original - and the first one she visited as a young teen. She shared stories with me of coming here and marveling at the tiered Afternoon Teas that would arrive at her table, filled with scones, finger sandwiches and sweets. She questioned whether or not she might have been a bit too old at fifteen to celebrate her birthday here and then spent the rest of the afternoon wandering around New York blowing sparkle-filled bubbles, dressed in a pair of shimmering fairy wings acquired from the tea shop's front room, which is filled with whimsical retail items. On our visit to Alice's, Olivia, now a mature twenty-five, had her usual - a pumpkin scone with a personal pot of tea - while Tom, our photographer, ordered "the biggest coffee" they had. It arrived in a mug "the size of Tom's face. " Olivia pointed out all the Alice in Wonderland themed decorations that she remembered from previous visits, including a quote from the character of the Duchess written in fun purple font along the walls and an angry painting of the red queen in the bathroom, telling employees to wash their hands or "Off with your head! " Her favorite little decorative touch, however, was on the swinging door into the kitchen. There is a giant keyhole window, suggesting that maybe, like Alice, the diners had shrunk to the size of mice, and would be swept away into a magical land, scones and teacups in hand.

More Brunch nearby

Lost Gem
Alice's Tea Cup 1 Breakfast Tea Shops Brunch American undefined

Alice's Tea Cup

Across the park and nine streets north from the 64th Street location, Olivia, a member of the Manhattan Sideways team, was still visibly excited to be sitting down to breakfast at Alice's Tea Cup. Though she loves each of the teahouse's three "chapters, " the 73rd Street cafe is the original - and the first one she visited as a young teen. She shared stories with me of coming here and marveling at the tiered Afternoon Teas that would arrive at her table, filled with scones, finger sandwiches and sweets. She questioned whether or not she might have been a bit too old at fifteen to celebrate her birthday here and then spent the rest of the afternoon wandering around New York blowing sparkle-filled bubbles, dressed in a pair of shimmering fairy wings acquired from the tea shop's front room, which is filled with whimsical retail items. On our visit to Alice's, Olivia, now a mature twenty-five, had her usual - a pumpkin scone with a personal pot of tea - while Tom, our photographer, ordered "the biggest coffee" they had. It arrived in a mug "the size of Tom's face. " Olivia pointed out all the Alice in Wonderland themed decorations that she remembered from previous visits, including a quote from the character of the Duchess written in fun purple font along the walls and an angry painting of the red queen in the bathroom, telling employees to wash their hands or "Off with your head! " Her favorite little decorative touch, however, was on the swinging door into the kitchen. There is a giant keyhole window, suggesting that maybe, like Alice, the diners had shrunk to the size of mice, and would be swept away into a magical land, scones and teacups in hand.