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Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse

Opening Hours
Today: 12–10pm
Fri:
Closed
Sat:
Closed
Sun:
4–10pm
Mon:
12–10pm
Tues:
12–10pm
Wed:
12–10pm
Location
16 East 48th Street
Neighborhoods
Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 1 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East

Named after Bible verses in Isaiah (the wolf and the lamb shall feed together), this restaurant opened in Manhattan in 1998, and expanded to Brooklyn the following year. Initially a traditional kosher deli, it later reinvented itself as a steakhouse. The extensive menu ranges from matzo ball soup to salmon burgers, veal Bolognese gnocchi and, of course, includes a variety of steaks and chops. Drawing on influences as diverse as Vietnamese, Tex-Mex, and French-country, Wolf and Lamb adapts its more customary function to a cosmopolitan venue. "Just because you're keeping kosher doesn't mean you have to sacrifice on quality," shared a waitress. And while we were told that the majority of customers keep kosher regularly, the crowded space was testament to Wolf and Lamb's broad culinary appeal.

Location
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Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 1 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East
Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 2 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East
Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 3 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East
Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 4 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East
Wolf & Lamb Steakhouse 5 American Kosher Steakhouses Midtown East

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