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7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs

Opening Hours
Today: 12pm–4am
Tues:
12pm–4am
Wed:
12pm–4am
Thurs:
12pm–4am
Fri:
12pm–4am
Sat:
12pm–4am
Sun:
12pm–4am
Location
108 Avenue B
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 1 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida

You might recognize this classic, horseshoe-shaped bar, that was built in the 1920’s, from such hit movies as The Godfather Part II, The Verdict, Crocodile Dundee, Serpico or TV favorites like "Sex and the City" and, most recently, "Person of Interest." Despite their fame, they are just a friendly and inexpensive watering hole with screens in every direction – a safe bet for a classic New York sports bar experience that many of us have had. And yes, there is a side entrance.

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7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 1 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 2 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 3 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 4 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 5 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 6 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 7 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 8 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 9 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 10 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida
7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs 11 Bars Sports Bars Alphabet City East Village Little Germany Loisaida

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Lost Gem
Tokio 7 1 Consignment Women's Shoes Mens Shoes Women's Clothing Mens Clothing undefined

Tokio 7

Most business owners know how difficult it is to bounce back after being robbed. Makoto Wantanabe has done it twice and, ironically, has a thief to thank for the very birth of Tokio 7. Makoto was globetrotting in the early 1990s when he arrived in Southern California on what was supposed to be the penultimate stop on his tour. He befriended a homeless man and let him stay in his hotel room for the night, but Makoto awoke to find everything except for his passport was stolen. Stranded with no money and far from his home in the Japanese countryside, Makoto called one of his only contacts in the U. S., who worked at a Japanese restaurant in Manhattan. He scrounged up enough money for a bus ticket and was off. While in New York, Makoto felt that men’s clothing suffered from a lack of style. Having always had a knack for fashion, he knew he could change that but lacked the funds to open a store with brand new clothing. So, after several years of saving his wages as a waiter, he founded one of the first consignment shops in New York City. Tokio 7 now carries men’s and women’s clothes, with the overarching theme being, as Makoto says, that they are simply “cool. ” The clothes are mostly from Japanese designers and name brands with unique twists. In the store, clothing that has been donated with a lot of wear is labeled “well loved. ”Despite its importance in the community, the shop fell on tough times during the COVID-19 pandemic. To make matters worse, Tokio 7 was looted in the summer of 2020 and had 300 items stolen. When Makoto contemplated closing his doors permanently, longtime customers begged him to reconsider. Resilient as ever, he set up a small photography area in the back of the shop and sold a portion of his clothes online to compensate for the decline of in-person purchases. Reflecting on his journey, Makoto marveled at the whims of fate. Had he not been robbed all of those decades ago in California, he had planned to start a life in the Amazon rainforest

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Blue & Gold Tavern 1 Bars Beer Bars Sports Bars undefined

Blue & Gold Tavern

“By 1958, it was a social club. My grandfather's friends from Ukraine — everyone who had survived WWII — were spending time here. ” Mike’s grandfather, Michael Roscishewsky Sr., was very strict. He had a set of rules by which he ran Blue & Gold, named for the colors of his country’s flag. He wore a three-piece suit and tie topped with an apron every day. He also would not allow in anyone wearing denim, and women could not come in unaccompanied. “When he ultimately let women come in on their own, as well as people wearing jeans, he thought it was the end of the world, ” Mike shared. Mike’s grandfather traveled through Germany in the 1940s, then to England, and eventually landed in the East Village. He owned a grocery store on 10th Street, saved up enough money, and opened Blue & Gold. He ran the bar until he retired in 1981, and his daughter, Julia, Mike’s mom, took over. On Christmas Eve of 1989, when Mike was only seventeen, the bartender took the evening off. “I covered her shift, and since then I have worked behind the bar, here and there, while running the whole place. My mom retired in full in 2002. ” Back in the day, Blue & Gold opened at 9 a. m. as they welcomed the retired firemen, police officers, and other members of the community. “We were a family. If I was five minutes late, there was always a line of retired guys waiting for me. ” In the 1970s, Mike’s grandfather was one of the first to have a color TV, allowing people to come in to watch the Yankees. He also had an air conditioner, making it the place that everyone wanted to spend time. The flow of clientele was slow and steady: they would come in from opening until noon, have two or three drinks, and leave, and then the next shift would arrive to occupy the barstools between noon and 6 p. m. “They had their quotas of what they could drink and afford. Nobody drinks like that anymore. ”As the scene in the East Village began to change, Mike witnessed Blue & Gold transform from a place for old Ukrainians, to a hangout for musicians, poets, and artists, to becoming a college bar. During the week, they would greet the older clientele and on the weekends the younger folk. More recently, Mike found there is a switch where the regulars change up every five years or so. “Most come to New York with a hope and a dream and it takes them about this amount of time to realize it isn't, necessarily, going to work. However, all roads continue to lead to Blue & Gold. If you come to New York, you find your way to us. ”