About usPartner with usSign up to our Newsletter

The Sweet Shop New York City

Opening Hours
Today: 2–10pm
Fri:
2–11pm
Sat:
2–11pm
Sun:
2–10pm
Mon:
Closed
Tues:
2–10pm
Wed:
2–10pm
Location
404 East 73rd Street
The Sweet Shop New York City 1 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East

"Like a kid in a candy shop" is not an adequate description of how I felt walking into The Sweet Shop. I felt even happier: I was an adult in a candy shop, both dazzled by the color and array of decadent desserts and warmed by the nostalgia brought on by the chocolate cigars and sugar wafers of my childhood. As I watched the flow of customers going in and out of the small store, I realized that I was not alone in my thoughts. All ages come in, with big smiles on their faces, to buy treats from the Candyman, himself.

"We're a nostalgic experience," the Candyman, also known as Kelly Jaime, said when he saw my jaw drop as I walked in the door. Since 2000, Kelly has lived in the neighborhood while working in sales for a Fortune 500 company, and continually lamented that there were no late-night ice cream stores. In 2013, he decided to solve the problem himself. What started as a simple ice cream parlor, however, turned into a place serving candy and ice cream. "The demographic in this area changed overnight," he explained. "It's much younger – there are strollers everywhere." With this new kind of audience, Kelly decided to offer all sorts of sweet delicacies rather than ice cream alone. This meant he could sell his favorite treats: marshmallows.

"You have to understand this about my dad," his son piped up. "He loves marshmallows." The sweet shop is a family-run business. Kelly and his son Matthew, also known as "Pie Guy," man the store while his wife, Glyn, is the designer behind the Willy Wonka-esque decor. She even made the breath-taking chandelier made of candies and the whimsical sweet-themed cabinet door handles. One of the few things in the space that Glyn created, but did not illustrate, is the little logo of Kelly in his uniform, which they commissioned an artist to do.

Despite the fact that Kelly decided not to focus solely on ice cream, he is still very proud of the frozen treats. "We sell five of the top ten ice creams in New York," he beamed. He pointed out that there is no other location in the city where you can find this many varieties of high quality ice cream in one place. He carries OddFellows and Van Leeuwen standard choices, as well as Van Leeuwen's vegan flavors. He also sells Snowballs, which he describes as, "Better than a snow cone – just smooth, slushified ice." Even though the whole store is filled with sugar, Kelly says that he is very careful not to feed unhealthy habits. "We are selling small things," he said. He showed me an example of the tiniest size cone that he fills. They are custom-made by a secret source solely for him, and though he originally meant them for children, they are also bought by many health-conscious adults, counting the nearby medical community among those constituents. Kelly went on to tell me that he buys the highest quality candy and has Underwest Donuts delivered fresh everyday. "We are a fresh fruit stand for candy," he said with a smile.

Moving away from the ice cream counter, Kelly was eager to show off his chocolate collection. He carries a variety, from companies that have been in production since the 1940s to the Mast Brothers, a relatively new chocolatier. He also has a lot of "bean to bar" creations that emphasize the flavor of the cacao bean. When he saw me circling around, questioning where the Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were, Kelly quickly responded, "I don't sell anything that one can find in Duane Reade." Instead, The Sweet Shop has a private company that makes their amazing peanut butter cups.

Next Kelly had me walk over to the drawers upon drawers of Swedish candy. "This candy is just utterly, utterly delicious," Kelly exclaimed, filling up a bag for each of us from Manhattan Sideways. Next, Kelly gushed over his world famous butter crunch, saying that it has now been shipped to every continent, including Antarctica. And, of course, marshmallows can be found throughout the store, both on their own and in treats like the "Jakewich," a marshmallow wedged between two Tate's chocolate chip cookies.

Though the store is packed with candy, part of the treat of visiting the Sweet Shop is simply talking with the Candyman. Kelly is full of witticisms and stories. I overheard him telling a customer that the licorice was "black like my heart and just as delicious." He told me that a lot of his whimsical attitude is thanks to his grandmother, who worked with Walt Disney. When Kelly visited her as a child, she would throw him in the Magic Shop whenever she needed a babysitter. There is a small section of the Sweet Shop that acts as an ode to these childhood memories: Kelly pulled out a drawer at the bottom of the Swedish candy that was filled with vintage magic tricks, pranks, and fake candy. Not only that, but there are plastic ninjas and little optical treasures hidden around the room. Recognizing that every inch of space has an element of fun, I learned from Kelly that he had worked in an amusement park in his youth, and was greatly influenced by the excitement of entertainment.

When I inquired as to what might be next, this clever, warm man confided that he was about to launch his own chocolate bar line. The flavors were still a secret, but he seemed very excited. "I've been extremely happy with what we've been able to accomplish in two years," he said enthusiastically. There is no doubt that Kelly has managed to feature an outstanding variety for those of us with a sweet tooth. As we were leaving, Kelly's last words were, "Our family is trying to bring the best confectionary treats, by brand, into one place" From what each of us witnessed and tasted, we would have to agree that he has succeeded.

Location
Loading
Sign up to Sidestreet Updates
The Sweet Shop New York City 1 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 2 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 3 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 4 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 5 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 6 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 7 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 24 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 25 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 8 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 9 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 10 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 11 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 12 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 13 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 14 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 15 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 16 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 17 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 18 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 19 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 20 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 21 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 22 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East
The Sweet Shop New York City 23 Chocolate Candy Sweets Family Owned Upper East Side Uptown East

More places on 73rd Street

Lost Gem
Ronald McDonald House New York 1 Non Profit Organizations Social Services For Kids undefined

Ronald McDonald House New York

Ronald McDonald House is a very special place that provides a "temporary 'home away from home' for pediatric cancer patients and their families. " Having had an apartment, for a short time, just a few doors down from their 73rd Street location, I was aware of the wonderful work that they do. When I mentioned to Sophie, one of our Manhattan Sideways team members, that I wanted to feature them on 73rd, she lit up and shared her close connection to the organization on the West Coast. Sophie told me that she was honored to visit and help her mother volunteer with her miniature horses at the Los Angeles and Pasadena chapters. "I was immediately won over by their mission, but even more important, by the children themselves. A significant aspect of their programming is to provide children with the opportunity to just be kids, first and foremost. Seeing the kids interact with the miniature horses showed me how much excitement and exuberance these children have. The smiles on the faces of their parents were always equally heart-warming. "Ronald McDonald House New York has been providing care and support to families since 1978. They "coordinate emotional and physical services, psychological care, ministry support, wellness programs, tutors, music, art, transportation, activities for siblings, holiday and birthday parties, and camaraderie for parents struggling with their child's cancer diagnosis. " In addition, this particular location has a Greek Division that provides services for families from Greece and Cyprus, Camp Ronald McDonald in the summer, classes in English as a second language, therapy for dogs (Angels on a Leash), and Weird Science, where the kids conduct intriguing and engaging experiments. Love and care are Ronald McDonald's central tenants. New York has its own set of angels in the way of the volunteers who play a major role in the day to day lives of the children. The Day Team leads afternoon activities and the Evening Team coordinates birthday parties, holidays, and dinners. The volunteer sign up is a major commitment to help provide a sense of normalcy and strength to the children and their families. If interested in volunteering, please visit their website.

Lost Gem
KRB 1 Antiques undefined

KRB

Kate Rheinstein Brodsky, the creator of KRB, was immersed in the world of design and retail from a young age. Her mother, Suzanne Rheinstein, is an internationally recognized designer. Ever since Kate was a child, her mom has run Hollyhock, a Los Angeles furniture boutique. "I really loved retail, " Kate shared, telling me how she would go to Hollyhock after school and work there over summer breaks. As a teenager, she wanted to open a bookstore, but realized that this might be difficult in the digital age. As a "homebody" and frequent hostess, Kate knew that she enjoyed creating beautiful homes, both for herself and others. As she described it, "I loved the feeling of home, of having a nice place to live in. " Ultimately, her passion for retail manifested itself in a career in the design world. Upon graduating from New York University with a degree in art history, Kate worked for Jeffrey Bilhuber, the interior designer. "I love interior design... but I'm not an interior designer, " she said. Working for Jeffrey, however, she learned a lot of things that would help her later on in the world of retail. She realized the importance of customer service and doing things "correctly, in a thoughtful manner. " Following her time with Jeffrey, she worked at Elle Decor, which taught her discipline and introduced her to new looks. "I was exposed to so many different styles, " she explains. "Sometimes you don't know you like something until you see it. " Kate has maintained a good relationship with Elle Decor – they recently featured her Upper East Side apartment as part of their "House Tour, " which brought a collection of readers, impressed by her style, to Kate's boutique. When I visited KRB, I was taken by the variety of colors, as opposed to the usual browns and golds that dominate antique shops. The salesperson, Fiona, said that adding bold colors to antique pieces is one of Kate's trademarks. She showed me some traditional chairs with bright olive green seats as an example, saying, "Green's a big color for her, " before pointing out Kate's love for French opaline. Fiona went on to say that Kate could be inspired by anything. She spoke of a box of old cameos that Kate found. When Fiona inquired, "What are you going to do with those? " Kate answered matter of factly, "I don't know, but I'll figure it out. " Kate elaborated, "I like to reinterpret old things. " By this, she means both in the pieces, as with the chairs, and in the way they are used. She told me that there are many beautiful finger bowls out there that are no longer used - or at least not as finger bowls. Kate encourages customers to use them in new ways, by putting votive candles in them or a small scoop of strawberry ice cream. "I like taking things out of their original context, " she admitted. As another example, she told me about the tric trac tables, tables used to play a precursor to backgammon. The board is so similar to backgammon that the tables have been able to be repurposed. "I get very attached to furniture, " Kate admitted, likening different pieces to rescue animals. "I want them to have good homes. " She realizes, however, that people have different styles and that she may have to wait a while for the right person to come along. She added that although her mother heavily influenced her, the two women do not always see eye to eye on design. "We have our own taste, " she said. Despite their differences, the store is still inspired by her mother's extraordinary career. "I always love watching her, how she explains to people how to incorporate beauty into their life. "There is the possibility that a third generation of Rheinstein women might enter the world of design. In 2015, Kate was the proud mom of new daughter number three. "I love that my children comprehend what I do, " she told me. When they ask her where she is going, she can answer "to the store" and they know exactly where she will be. Owning the boutique means she has a flexible work schedule and can easily spend a lot of time with her children. She specifically opened on the Upper East Side to be near her family – and other families. She wanted to be in a place where people could stumble upon her and buy a housewarming present, rather than in a design-industry-heavy neighborhood. "I just hope I'm on people's path. I encourage them to come look.... browsers welcome. " As for her daughters and what they think of her boutique, Kate told me that her five-year-old recently told her teacher that when she grows up, she wants to be "a mommy and a shopkeeper. "

Lost Gem
Ritika RAvi at IVAR  Jewelry undefined

IVAR by Ritika Ravi Fine Jewelry

Nestled between Madison and 5th Avenue on E 73rd Street is a jewelry box of worldly treasures. Ivar Jewelry by Ritika Ravi, opened December 2022, is the first New York outpost for the designer — a graduate of the London College of Fashion who splits her time between India and the United States, sourcing inspiration for her next piece. “My idea was to take traditional Indian craftsmanship and give it a more contemporary aesthetic, ” Ritika told us when, entranced by the store’s gorgeous pod-like display cases, we found ourselves poring over the delicate filigree and vibrant gemstones of several stackable rings. “There’s always this incredible gold Indian jewelry, that’s so beautifully made — it's so intricate, ” said Ritika, “but it can be very large and not really wearable. I took that concept and the jewelry making techniques and gave it more of a contemporary twist. ” After launching the brand in 2018 and a successful store opening in the Maldives, Ritika set her sights on New York. “It took me almost a year to find the right space, ” she said, adding that it took several trips from India and extended stays in the city to settle on the 825-square foot space on the Upper East Side. Ivar, a woman-owned business, employs a mostly female workforce, “from the front office to stores. ” Now, Ritika is happy to bring traditional Indian jewelry-making techniques and materials like polki (the art of using untreated raw, uncut diamonds) and enamel to the city, as well as incorporate sustainable sourcing practices and a commitment to global outreach — employing skilled artisans who have generations of jewelry-making experience and donating to the Andrea Bocelli Foundation, an organization dedicated to empowering communities in poverty. And after one trip in to meet the talented designer and marvel at each delicate, glittering pod, we’re certain we’ll be back for more than just window shopping.